Mandolins

Central to classical music and American music genres, the mandolin has a higher pitch than a guitar, but has the same mellow tone. While mandolins date back to the Middle Ages, modern musicians use them in genres ranging from rock to bluegrass. LAWK STAR Guitars is proud to offer a selection of beautiful mandolins.

Mandolin Buying Guide

BODY STYLES:   Florentine (F-style): Has a decorative scroll near the neck and a scroll carved into the headstock. The two points on the instrument’s body influence its tone and provide resting points on a seated player’s leg. Bluegrass, root-music and country musicians often play F-style mandolins for its chunkier, jazzy sound.  Artist (A-style): The instrument is pear shaped. The headstock is simple and the body has no points on it. Bluegrass, Celtic and classical musicians often play A-style mandolins because of their robust midranges.  Neapolitan (Round- or bowl-back): This type of mandolin resembles a lute because of the shape of its back. The instrument produces a rounder, deeper lush tone.

SOUND HOLES:  F-shaped holes: F-shaped holes on either side of the strings (like a violin) have a strong, crisp, focused sound.  Oval hole: An oval hole on a mandolin gives it rich lower overtones. An oval hole does not project as much sound as F-shaped holes.

WOOD TYPLE:    Spruce is the standard in regards to mandolin tops, or soundboards, because of the bright tones it produces. Some makers use mahogany or cedar to reduce costs or produce a deeper tone. It’s common for the necks to have a hardwood, such as ebony or rosewood, to help players fret faster.

The mandolin continues to be a vital instrument across musical genres. After choosing a mandolin, LAWK STAR encourages you to protect it with a hard case.

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